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Cyberonics Pursuing Morbid Obesity As Third NCP Indication

This article was originally published in The Gray Sheet

Executive Summary

Pilot clinical studies of Cyberonics' NCP pulse generator vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) system for the treatment of morbid obesity are likely to begin by July, President and CEO Robert Cummins announced during an October 12 teleconference.

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Cyberonics' Model 101

Next-generation NeuroCybernetic Prosthesis (NCP) generator will launch immediately at a list price of $11,450 following receipt of FDA clearance on Jan. 31, Robert Cummins, president and CEO, announces at the U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray conference Feb. 1. The device is "22% thinner, 31% lighter and up to 34% more cost effective [than its predecessor]," the Model 100 series ($9,100), Cummings remarks. Separately, a clinical study evaluating use of the vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) system in treating morbid obesity will commence by mid-2000. The firm also is planning to study the system for treatment of drug-refractive depression, following promising pilot study data from 30 patients. Results showed that 40% of patients eight weeks post-implant reported a greater than 50% reduction in depression (1"The Gray Sheet" Oct. 18, p. 11). FDA approved the device in July 1997 for patients over 12 with medically intractable partial seizures who are not candidates for potentially curative surgical resection

Cyberonics' Model 101

Next-generation NeuroCybernetic Prosthesis (NCP) generator will launch immediately at a list price of $11,450 following receipt of FDA clearance on Jan. 31, Robert Cummins, president and CEO, announces at the U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray conference Feb. 1. The device is "22% thinner, 31% lighter and up to 34% more cost effective [than its predecessor]," the Model 100 series ($9,100), Cummings remarks. Separately, a clinical study evaluating use of the vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) system in treating morbid obesity will commence by mid-2000. The firm also is planning to study the system for treatment of drug-refractive depression, following promising pilot study data from 30 patients. Results showed that 40% of patients eight weeks post-implant reported a greater than 50% reduction in depression (1"The Gray Sheet" Oct. 18, p. 11). FDA approved the device in July 1997 for patients over 12 with medically intractable partial seizures who are not candidates for potentially curative surgical resection

Inamed's Lap Band Poised To Squeeze Out U.S. Morbid Obesity Market In 2000

Introduction of the Lap Band adjustable gastric banding system could increase Inamed obesity product sales up to four-fold by 2002, Inamed President Ilan Reich told investors attending the Bear Stearns Healthcare Conference Sept. 17 in New York City.

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